Étymologie

modifier
Du latin inanimatus.

Adjectif

modifier
Nature Forme
Positif inanimate
\ɪ.ˈnæn.ə.ˌmɪt\ ou \ɪ.ˈnæn.ɪ.ˌmət\
Comparatif more inanimate
\ˌmɔɹ ɪ.ˈnæn.ə.ˌmɪt\ ou \ˌmɔː ɪ.ˈnæn.ɪ.ˌmət\
Superlatif most inanimate
\ˌmoʊst ɪ.ˈnæn.ə.ˌmɪt\ ou \ˌməʊst ɪ.ˈnæn.ɪ.ˌmət\

inanimate \ɪ.ˈnæn.ə.ˌmɪt\ (États-Unis), \ɪ.ˈnæn.ɪ.ˌmət\ (Royaume-Uni)

  1. Inanimé, inerte.

Antonymes

modifier

Nom commun

modifier
Singulier Pluriel
inanimate
\ɪ.ˈnæn.ə.ˌmɪt\
ou \ɪ.ˈnæn.ɪ.ˌmət\
inanimates
\ɪ.ˈnæn.ə.ˌmɪts\
ou \ɪ.ˈnæn.ɪ.ˌməts\

inanimate \ɪ.ˈnæn.ə.ˌmɪt\ (États-Unis), \ɪ.ˈnæn.ɪ.ˌmət\ (Royaume-Uni)

  1. (Linguistique) Inanimé.
    • English also differentiates between humans versus non-human animates and inanimates with respect to which relative pronoun is used: compare the book which I read; the bird which flew away (not *the book whom I read or *the bird who flew away) and the girl whom I saw (not *the girl which I saw). We could, in fact, refine the English animacy hierarchy to something like proper nouns and kin terms > humans > other animates > inanimates. — (Viveka Velupillai, An Introduction to Linguistic Typology, 2012, ISBN 9789027211989, p. 158)
      La traduction en français de l’exemple manque. (Ajouter)

Antonymes

modifier