AnglaisModifier

ÉtymologieModifier

(Nom 1, verbe) Du vieux norrois slóð.
(Nom 2) Du vieil anglais slǣwþ.

Nom commun 1 Modifier

Singulier Pluriel
sleuth
\sljuːθ\
sleuths
\sljuːθs\

sleuth

  1. (Désuet) Piste d'animal.
  2. (Archaïsme) Limier.
  3. Détective.
    • Do ye want me to become a sleuth, or engage detectives to track the objects of your erroneous philanthropy? — (Edith Van Dyne (Frank L. Baum), Aunt Jane’s Nieces at Millville, 1908)

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Verbe Modifier

Temps Forme
Infinitif to sleuth
\sljuːθ\
Présent simple,
3e pers. sing.
sleuths
\sljuːθs\
Prétérit sleuthed
\sljuːθt\
Participe passé sleuthed
\sljuːθt\
Participe présent sleuthing
\sljuːθ.ɪŋ\
voir conjugaison anglaise

sleuth \sljuːθ\ transitif intransitif

  1. Faire le détective.
    • We must discover where he lives, what he does — sleuth him, in fact! — (Agatha Christie, The Secret Adversary, 1922)

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Nom commun 2Modifier

Singulier Pluriel
sleuth
\sljuːθ\
sleuths
\sljuːθs\

sleuth

  1. (Désuet) Lenteur, paresse, sloth.
  2. (Rare) (Zoologie) Groupe d'ours.
    • As quietly as if I were practicing to join a sleuth of bears, I crept out the door and went on home, eventually winding up in the garage... — (Noel Perrin, A Passport Secretly Green, 1961, page 89)
    • If these dainty adventurers weren't being chased by a sleuth of bears or bogeys, they were being captured by Gypsies or thieves. — (Bobbie Ann Mason, The Girl Sleuth, 1995, page 13)
    • From the darkness came the howls of routs of wolves and bands of coyotes, the rumbling growls of a sleuth of bears or the bugles of a gang of elk. — (Elinor De Wire, The Lightkeepers’ Menagerie: Stories of Animals at Lighthouses, 2007, page 200)

SynonymesModifier

(1)
(2)

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RéférencesModifier

  • Cet article utilise des informations de l’article du Wiktionnaire en anglais, sous licence CC BY-SA 3.0 : sleuth.